Sweet Truths

Sweet Truths
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Description:

Author: Akshay Chandra Sharma (Translated from Hindi by Chandra Rampuria)
Pages: 112
Year of Publication: First published 2000, Third edition 2010
Price: HB Rs 150, FB Rs 100
ISBN:
HB 978-81-8157-939-9 (9788181579399)
FB 978-81-8157-954-6 (9788181579546)

About the Author:
Akshay Chandra Sharma was born in Rajasthan in 1918. He was the Principal of Bharatiya Vidya Mandir (Bikaner) and founded its research centre. His books include Taponishtha Bharat and Bharat Vibhutiya. He has written articles for magazines and newspapers like Saaptahik Hindustan and Vishal Bharat. A firm believer in Gandhian philosophy, as a writer, his objective was to spread noble ideas and practical idealism through his writings. He passed away in 2009.

About the Translator:
Chandra Rampuria was born in Anandnagar, Uttar Pradesh, in 1946. She graduated in Music, specializing in the Sitar. She married into the Rampuria family of Bikaner and has two sons. Homemaking apart, she enjoys gardening and reading English and Hindi literature. She was a student of Akshay Chandra Sharma. Her A Writer’s Notebook was published by Writers Workshop, India, in 2009.

Teaser:
A collection of creative middles inspired by the author’s life and experiences, this book has been compiled from Akshay Chandra Sharma’s regular column, “Chintan-Manan” (Random Reflections) in a Calcutta daily. One of his pieces is given below.

Expectations

An old man was asked, “How many sons do you have?”

A riddling reply, “One, two, hundred and more.” A pause, then he added, “I have one son who eats food for two, and quarrels and fights with everyone as much as hundred would. When I ask him to work, he doesn’t, so he is as good as no son.”

So goes the story.

There are problems in life. They can be one or two or several – even a hundred or none. It depends upon our attitude to life. We want to improve everybody except ourselves.

A leader wants people to be good and righteous and the people want the leader to be what he wants them to be. When we point one finger in accusation we fail to see the three fingers accusing our own self.

We should remember that we will get from life only what we bring to it.

Contents:
98 middles

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